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Over Easter in 2013, Jirina and I flew to over to Stockholm for an extended weekend of vintage shenanigans. I wanted to share these gorgeous tattoo designs that date back to the 1920s and 1930s and originate from Denmark. They are the courtesy of Sjöhistoriska museet in Stockholm.

I first saw these designs pop up on my Instagram feed a few months back – and immediately fell in love! Most notably, with the finger waved babe holding the globe. Also, who could resist a badass raven haired dame with a booty, riding a chameleon? I sure can’t. So I knew that I couldn’t miss this “Faith, Hope and Love” exhibition of vintage sailor tattoos at Sjöhistoriska whilst we were in town. I have since decided that the lady with the globe will be my very first tattoo.

The “Faith, Hope and Love” exhibit is open until the end of 2014 so if you’re in Stockholm, it is definitely well worth a visit. All of the text is in Swedish, though, so you would probably get the most out of it with an English speaking guide. In fact, I’d love to see it again with a guided tour as apparently the exhibit features a gender aspect that we didn’t fully grasp because of our less-than-perfect Swedish skills. The images alone, however, are so fascinating! Have a peek right below.

1920s tattoos 1920s tattoos 1920s tattoos 1920s tattoos 1920s tattoos 1920s tattoos

TO BE CONTINUED…

 

Betty Balfour in Love, Life and Laughter

Betty Balfour in Love, Life and Laughter
Photograph: British Film Institute

 

Genuinely exciting news broke out earlier this month. A long-thought lost film starring Betty Balfour, the “British Mary Pickford” and “Britain’s Queen of Happiness”, and written and directed by George Pearson, a pioneer of British film, was discovered in the Netherlands. The film is Love, Life and Laughter (1923). It was listed as one of the British Film Institute’s “75 Most Wanted” lost films.

What made the news especially joyous for me personally was that the film was found and identified by a friend of mine: film archivist, restorer and researcher Bin Li. We met whilst in university in London and connected through our mutual appreciation of the history of cinema. It felt pretty surreal to browse Facebook one morning and come across these incredible news told by a friend – and, a few days later, by the press world wide. But I was left wanting to hear Bin’s side of the story. After all, I can’t even imagine the thrill an archivist must feel upon such a discovery!

Here Bin Li shares his first impressions of the silent masterpiece, talks about the film’s importance to contemporary understanding of Betty Balfour’s stardom and what’s in store for Love, Life and Laughter before it plays on the big screen after 90 years.

 

Betty Balfour in Love, Life and Laughter  Photograph: British Film Institute

Betty Balfour in Love, Life and Laughter
Photograph: British Film Institute

 

– Can you talk a bit about your work and education?
I am a film archivist, restorer and researcher. I am now doing volunteer work at EYE Film Institute Netherlands and Haghefilm film lab at Amsterdam. I am a graduate of the MA Preservation and Presentation of the Moving Image at the University of Amsterdam and MA Film and Television at the University of Westminster. The preservation master is quite unique. It combines both theory and practice. We did one-year theoretical study at university and half-year internship at a film institution depends on personal preference. I did mine at EYE doing decomposed nitrate film control and acetate film registration. After graduation, I continued doing my projects and doing nitrate identification and registration as well.

 

– How did the Love, Life and Laughter footage end up at the EYE archives? How did you end up going through the material?
I suppose everyone now know from the news that the film was found in an old cinema at a small town in the Netherlands, that is what the press are interested. There are lots of mistakes and wrong information in the news. The true story is that my supervisor the head of collection management of EYE found 4 boxes of unregistered films on the floor in one of our nitrate vaults. Even she did not know what they are and how did they come there, so she gave the task to me as I am the only one doing nitrate identification and registration at the moment at the archive. My supervisor went through all the records and found out that one of our employees accepted those films two years ago and just put them in our vault unregistered, and did not inform others either. The whole party contains 25 cans of 35mm films and 30 cans of 28mm films. I then started identifying and registering them. All the 35mm film cans were rusty and 4 cans of films are already decomposed with nitrate honey. It is a 1916 American film; the only known copy exists is in the BFI. Except Love, Life and Laughter, I also identified a rare 1917 Rosa Porten film, which is being restored at Haghefilm and will be screened at this year’s Bologna Il Cinema Ritrovato festival.

 

Copyright: Bin Li and EYE Film Institute Netherlands

Copyright: Bin Li and EYE Film Institute Netherlands

 

– How did you identify the film?
For Love, Life and Laughter, it was not so difficult to identify, although it has Dutch title and intertitle. The Dutch title reads “Squibs als Tip-Toes, de Koningin van de Music Halls, in 6 Acten.” (Squibs as Tip-Toes, the queen of Music Halls, in 6 acts). It also has Betty Balfour on it. “Squibs” is the character’s name that Betty Balfour had been played in a series of films collaborated with director George Pearson only one exists today unfortunately. Tip-Toes is Betty Balfour’s character’s name in Love, Life and Laughter. Given the film’s importance as listed by the BFI, I then looked at the film carefully and compared several characters in the film with all the stills listed on the BFI’s website and the actors’ photos online and finally confirmed that this is the lost masterpiece.

 

Copyright: Bin Li and EYE Film Institute Netherlands

Copyright: Bin Li and EYE Film Institute Netherlands

 

TO BE CONTINUED…

 

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  • About Riikka

  • Welcome to 21st Century Flapper!
    My name is Riikka and I hail from Helsinki, Finland. I'm a film researcher and a freelance journalist, a sartorial devotee of vintage fashion and endlessly fascinated by early 20th century visual culture. I write about film, fashion, design, architecture - and all things old and pretty.

    Olen helsinkiläinen elokuvatutkija ja toimittaja, jonka intohimo on 1900-luvun alkupuolen visuaalinen kulttuuri. Blogi sivuaa kiinnostuksenkohteitani 1920- ja 1930-luvun elokuvista aina ajan muotiin ja designiin asti.



    Don’t hesitate to say hi or contact in case of any questions at
    riikka @ 21stcenturyflapper.com














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